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Comanche

is a 75 year old authentic and unique Cutter Ship (built in 1944) that is available to the public for free self-guided tours, and is the only functional vessel of its kind containing its original equipment.
 

Thanks to volunteers and donors, guests can come aboard and learn about marine vessel operation, safety & restoration, WWII history, as well as environmental science all while feeling what it would be like to be part of the US Navy or Coast Guard Crew.

 

Comanche is an apolitical, non-religious, non-military, and gender inclusive organization. Current notable affiliations include the US Coast Guard Tug Association, Museumships, Retired Tug Boat Association and Historic Naval Ships Association.

 

The Comanche 202 Foundation has been a federally approved non-profit organization since September 11, 2007. The Comanche 202 Foundation was incorporated in the state of Washington in May 2007, and was approved as a 501 (c) 3 on September 11, 2007.

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History & Accolades

 

      1944 - 1959

Comanche served in WWII as a rescue and attack cutter as the USN ATA 202. In May of 1945, it was awarded a battle star for combat action during the invasion of Okinawa, Japan. 

      1959 - 1980

Comanche was transferred to the Coast Guard as USCG WMEC 202 to do coastal search and rescue work, piracy patrol in the Caribbean as well as supply lightships and lighthouses. During this time of Coast Guard service, Comanche gave the first ever notice of violation to a foreign fishing vessel in the US Pacific Coast Fisheries. In January of 1980, Comanche was decommissioned after 37 years of US Government service, during this time Comanche is believed to have saved hundreds of lives.

      1990 - 2007

Comanche was brought to the Puget Sound to begin her third career as a commercial ocean-going tug towing a wide variety of floating objects from Alaska to South America and on the Puget Sound.

      2007 - Today

Comanche was donated to the Comanche 202 Foundation for preservation and use. Since then, over 45,000 volunteer hours have gone into her restoration and maintenance.